Norwalk Police Bust Major Marijuana Operation After Finding Pot In Mail

  • Comments (26)
Norwalk police broke up a marijuana operation Thursday that is believed to have been sending in excess of 400 pounds of pot into the city. Above is 20 pounds of pot seized from a Taylor Avenue home on Thursday.
Norwalk police broke up a marijuana operation Thursday that is believed to have been sending in excess of 400 pounds of pot into the city. Above is 20 pounds of pot seized from a Taylor Avenue home on Thursday. Photo Credit: Norwalk Police Department
Daniel Evans, 29, of Canoga Park, Calif., was arrested by Norwalk police Thursday in connection with an alleged pot operation.
Daniel Evans, 29, of Canoga Park, Calif., was arrested by Norwalk police Thursday in connection with an alleged pot operation. Photo Credit: Norwalk Police Department
Manoah "Tony" Dunbar, 29, of Taylor Avenue in Norwalk, was arrested by Norwalk police Thursday in connection with an alleged pot operation.
Manoah "Tony" Dunbar, 29, of Taylor Avenue in Norwalk, was arrested by Norwalk police Thursday in connection with an alleged pot operation. Photo Credit: Norwalk Police Department

NORWALK, Conn. – Using a drug-sniffing K-9 officer, in addition to assistance from the U.S. Postal Service, the Norwalk Police Department busted a major marijuana operation Thursday that may have been funneling hundreds of pounds of pot into Norwalk annually, police said.

Two men were arrested in connection with the operation, including the alleged mastermind who sent 20 pounds of pot through the mail from California that was delivered to a Taylor Avenue home Thursday, police said.

According to Lt. Jim Walsh, commander of the department’s Special Services Division, Daniel Evans, 29, of Canoga Park, Calif., used a fake name to send the pot to the home of a friend, Manoah “Tony” Dunbar, also 29, of Taylor Avenue. Evans grew up in Norwalk and moved to California, but he kept ties with friends in the city, Walsh said.

The package had been intercepted by police and postal inspectors Wednesday at the main postal hub in Stamford after Norwalk Police Sgt. Frank Reda supervised K-9 officer “Czar” as the dog sniffed boxes, police said.

Czar identified pot in one of the boxes, and postal inspectors obtained a warrant to open the box, police said.

Inside were 20 individual vacuum-sealed bags of pot, each weighing one pound. According to Walsh, each one pound bag could be worth about $4,000 on the street, but if the contents were cut up then each bag could yield considerably more money. Even though bags were vacuum sealed, and the package double boxed, Czar was able to identify the contents, he said.

The box was addressed to Dunbar’s Taylor Avenue address in Norwalk, police said. An undercover postal inspector delivered the package Thursday just after 4 p.m., police said. Police had removed much of the pot and put in dummy weights. Dunbar accepted the package and officers moved in to arrest him, police said.

Evans was also at the home at the time and was taken into custody, police said.

According to Walsh, Evans is believed to have been sending 20 to 25 similar-size packages to various Norwalk addresses annually, or more than 400 pounds of pot each year. Police did not disclose how long the operation had been active.

Evans would fly in from California to receive the package from the friend, police said. Officers are investigating the names and addresses of others who may have aided Evans, police said. Walsh did not say how many people or addresses in Norwalk may be involved.

Police said Evans would then distribute the pot throughout the city and the area. Some of the “brand names” that the pot was allegedly sold under were “OG” and “3X.”

“There is a lot of cash profits in marijuana these days,” said Walsh. “Especially on the East Coast.”

Walsh said Dunbar knew what was in the box but may not have been involved in the operation other than to allow his address to be used.

Norwalk police, in cooperation with postal inspectors and officials with UPS and FedEx, periodically conducts searches with K-9 officers of boxes headed to Norwalk addresses, according to Walsh.

Dunbar and Evans were each charged with multiple counts of illegal possession and sale of marijuana. Dunbar posted $1,500 bond and Evans posted $75,000 bond – which was lowered from $100,000 by a bail commissioner, said Walsh.

The two were scheduled to appear in Norwalk Superior Court on June 19.

  • 26
    Comments

Comments (26)

I was wondering why my "package" had not arrived. Now I know.

I don't see how this will make victims in Norwalk that have had House breaks car breakins and asaults these last couple of weeks feel better about the safety of the city with this huge bust.May have been is a very big assumption this just shows grasping at straws only ends up cutting one up for one good line.

May 09, 2013
Connecticut decriminalizes possession of marijuana

Possession of a half-ounce or less of marijuana is a civil violation in Connecticut, punishable by a fine of up to $150. It is not a jailable offense. Subsequent offenses are subject to increased fines of $200-$500, and upon a third violation, offenders are referred to a drug awareness program. Most importantly though, those accused of being in possession are not arrested or saddled with a criminal record. In addition to the fine, anyone under 21 who is found in possession of less than a half-ounce of marijuana faces a 60-day suspension of his or her driver's license.

Personally I cant believe its still illegal. The way CT loves to tax people its amazing they dont see the potential here. And if pots a gateway drug then so are beer and cigarettes.

Please ask your legislators to take marijuana off the criminal market and tax and regulate it similarly to alcohol.

Marijuana Policy Project
236 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Suite 400
Washington, D.C. 20002
202-462-5747
info@mpp.org

http://www.mpp.org/states/connecticut/

Great idea! But they arent very interested because even though its common sense its not a popular thought. God forbid our legislature push something because it actually makes sense. Keep trying though, I will. Pot being illegal saddles this state with many millions of dollars in burden from incarcerating, enforcement, trials, programs etc. Swap all that expenditure for a new revenue stream. Easy peasy if you just do whats obvious.

The tax will never offset the cost to care for all the brain dead citizens from the pot and the harder drug to follow.

' Street Pot ',probably does destroy the brain at a much accelerated rate because it is usually laced with warfarin or formaldehyde or both plus other things.
Regulated, cultivated, tested pot would pose much less a detriment to the brain..
' Mothers milk is a gateway to everything ' George Carlin .